Advice for New Working Moms: Stop Taking Advice

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The MPW Insiders Network is an online community where the biggest names in business and beyond answer timely career and leadership questions. Today’s answer for, “How do you deal with the pressures of work and being a new parent?” is written by Heather Zynczak, chief marketing officer at Pluralsight.

After having three kids in less than four years, I completely understand the excitement and worry that comes with juggling your career and family life. I’m the definition of a working mom, serving as a C-level executive at a tech startup while simultaneously raising my three rambunctious sons: ages six, seven, and nine.

During my early motherhood years, I never let up on my career’s gas pedal. I managed a large global team, was accountable for marketing over $3 billion in revenue, launched both the brand and product at a rising tech startup, and played a critical role in helping raise hundreds of millions of dollars in venture funding. To say I was busy was an understatement.

Here are some of the more surprising, unexpected insights I learned along the way:

It’s okay to change your mind

After becoming a parent, you can’t predict how you’ll feel until you’re in the moment. For me, this was a shocking revelation, because I am a planner by nature.

I approached becoming a working mom the same way. I planned every little detail about going back to work, only to find several aspects of my plan did not realistically work for me once I was confronted with the timeline. As an example, I initially scheduled my first day back to work, only to end up prolonging it by a month with my first son. On the flip side, after my third son’s arrival, I shortened my time off by four weeks. Along the way, I spent an absurd amount of time researching the perfect day care center, only to discover that day care did not work for us. Instead, we hired a nanny.

Drop the guilt

Becoming a mother will force you to reprioritize many things in your life. There will be times when you make decisions that feel like you are short-changing one aspect of your life. As long as you eventually strike a balance, don’t feel guilty about those decisions. Sheryl Sandberg wrote in Lean In that when she is not traveling for work, she leaves the office at 5 p.m. to be home for dinner. As a rule, when I am in town, I do not schedule meetings before 9 a.m. so I can spend time getting my three sons off to school with a big nutritious breakfast, a final check of their homework folder, and a healthy packed lunch.

So when you decline a 6 p.m. meeting invite from a colleague because you have decided to be home for family dinner, don’t feel guilty about it. And when you miss a school recital because you decided to attend a board meeting, don’t feel guilty about it either. Trade-offs are okay.

Continue onto Fortune to read more advice!

Habits Highly Successful Business Managers Have (and How to Get Them)
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According to Gallup, bad managers cost businesses billions each year, and account for at least 70% of variances in employee engagement scores. Having a highly successful business manager is crucial to the overall success of a company.

The problem, however, is that not everyone knows what type of habits effective managers have. By being able to identify what those habits are, businesses can take action to find the right people to fill the position, and managers can boost their productivity and increase their efficiency.

“There is always room for improvement, no matter how great of a manager you are,” explains Leon Goren, president and chief executive officer of PEO Leadership. “The good news is that making those improvements can often be simple. It’s just a matter of taking the steps to make it happen, to incorporate new habits that will lead to better outcomes.”

When managers take action to create effective habits, they see positive results in the overall success of their business. Here are some of the habits of highly successful business managers and how to nurture them:

  • Delegation skills. Highly successful leaders know how to delegate, rather than trying to do everything on their own. It’s imperative to learn to trust the people on your team.  If this is an issue for you, start by delegating small tasks and building on them. It’s also important that you have the right people in the right jobs.
  • Building a strong team. When hiring for your team, don’t just look at the candidate’s past experience and qualifications. Make sure that they are a good fit for your team and your overall corporate culture. Do they share the same values? Will they fit into your team’s unique dynamics? Do they understand what the expectations are? When you have the most qualified people – from both a fit and skills perspective, you will not only feel comfortable delegating tasks to them, you will also know they are working toward reaching your company goals. The right employees know how to work efficiently, are engaged, and exponentially help the company succeed.
  • Commitment to learning. The best managers never stop learning and understand that they will never know it all. They are committed to their development, they collaborate and bounce ideas off others, and they have mentors and join peer advisory boards to help them create robust and innovative solutions. These leaders continue to learn from others by discussing their challenges and opportunities and leveraging the knowledge and experience of their peers to help them grow. Joining a community like PEO Leadership, through their Senior Leadership Group, is a great investment in your personal, professional, and organizational growth.
  • Moving past fear. Being afraid to act can stifle management, which holds companies back. Highly successful leaders look to the future and are not afraid to take calculated risks. If this is something you are not comfortable with, consider engaging a leadership coach or joining a peer advisory board. Sharing your challenges and opportunities and getting feedback from multiple perspectives on your intended tactics, will enable you to apply the strategic advice to your plans and implement robust solutions. Having a mentor or successful peers review your plans will give you the confidence you need to carry them out.
  • Listening to others. Learn to actively listen to others. This is a skill that many people lack, even though it can be crucial to business success. Listen to your team, colleagues, mentors, etc. Listening doesn’t mean you have to heed their advice; nonetheless, hearing their thoughts, getting multiple perspectives and being an active listener, will help make you a more effective leader.

“It may seem overwhelming for someone to start laying the foundation to create numerous new habits all at once,” says Goren. “The best way to start is by selecting one thing to work on at a time. Once you have a good handle on it, move on to the next habit you’d like to incorporate. Before you know it, you will have many of these down, and it will be smooth sailing.”

PEO Leadership offers an executive leadership community that represents over 100 business leaders, successful entrepreneurs, and top executives. Its services include peer advisory boards, executive advisors/coaches, community connections, strategic business advice, an annual world-class leadership conference, and thought leadership events including PEO Leadership’s “The Way Forward” live webcast and podcast. The company is owned by Leon Goren, who has over 25 years of leadership experience.

PEO Leadership offers leadership advisory services in six categories, including for Presidents/C-suite executives of large national and multinational organizations, entrepreneurs of large national and multinational companies, global executives, small business entrepreneurs, senior executives, and businesses in transition. There is a 60-day free trial Leadership Bootcamp available. To get more information or obtain a free trial, visit the site at: https://peo-leadership.com.

About PEO Leadership

PEO Leadership is a Canadian peer-to-peer leadership advisory firm that has been the destination for business leaders to regularly meet and discuss important issues, solve problems and explore new opportunities since 1991. The organization provides a safe and highly confidential environment, with PEO Executive Advisors, who facilitate stimulating and astute dialogue to leverage the collective experience, creativity, intellect and wisdom of the Peer Advisory Board and the PEO Leadership Community at large. They support, cultivate and accelerate business leaders’ leadership excellence to achieve great impact through the organizations they lead, the communities they serve and the lives they live. Current members include Umbra, Miele, Crayola, ThinkOn and Nestle. For more information about the company and services, visit the site at: https://peo-leadership.com.

How sustainability achieved gender parity and what it means for women in business
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Our recent report on chief sustainability officers (CSOs) in the U.S. revealed that women went from holding 28 percent in 2011 of the CSO positions to 54 percent in 2021. That’s a 94 percent increase.

Our recent report on chief sustainability officers (CSOs) in the U.S. revealed that women went from holding 28 percent in 2011 of the CSO positions to 54 percent in 2021. That’s a 94 percent increase.

It’s a positive development to see the playing field level for women in sustainability, but what’s driving this trend? And what are the implications for women’s leadership in business more broadly? Before diving into those questions, it’s interesting to look at the trends in gender and leadership in sustainability and business.

The state of women’s leadership in sustainability
When it comes to women’s leadership as CSOs, the biggest jump happened between 2013 and 2014, when the number of women went up by 11 percentage points. There was another significant increase between 2018 and 2021, around the time the #MeToo movement gained momentum. In 2020, when more companies than ever hired their first CSO, female CSOs broke the 50 percent mark to reach their current status.

Outside of sustainability, women in business have not advanced as quickly. In the C-suite, men still far outnumber women. According to a Morningstar report looking at data from 2019, women hold only 12.2 percent of named executive officer roles at companies, up just 2.8 percentage points from 2015. The report authors noted that “this reflects a rate of growth that would only deliver equal representation sometime in the second half of this century.”

So why are women advancing more quickly in sustainability?

3 reasons women in sustainability are moving up
I can surmise three reasons women are advancing faster in sustainability than they are in business more broadly.

1. There’s a robust pipeline of women vying for these roles.
According to the 2020 GreenBiz State of the Profession report, which my firm sponsors, the percentage of women holding any sustainability position has been steadily rising since 2010. Between 2011 and 2020, the percentage of women holding a vice president role grew from 31 percent to 51 percent. The pool of female directors grew by 18 percentage points, from 37 percent to 55 percent. And the percentage of female managers in sustainability roles has gone up the most, from 39 percent to 63 percent. By contrast, the Morningstar authors pointed to the “broken rung” at major corporations, in which “women are systematically passed over being offered their first and crucial career promotion.”

Based on the GreenBiz data and my experience as a recruiter, I believe this is not happening in sustainable business roles, where there’s a deep talent pool of women, starting at the manager level and steadily making their way up the ranks.

2. Women excel in these roles.
As I have written about before, research suggests that women are well-suited to succeed in sustainability roles. A 2018 Business and Sustainable Development Commission report argued that women have the necessary leadership qualities to take on sustainable development, and they have the desire to address social and environmental challenges.

In my work, I have also found the “feminine” traits such as the ability to collaborate, translate complex issues and demonstrate humility help CSOs succeed. CSOs are not in it for the ego boost; they find it more fulfilling to champion others, praise generously and inspire others to support a vision for the future that benefits all.

3. The path to sustainability leadership is inclusive.
Unlike other C-suite positions, there’s no specific set of credentials that CSOs are required to have, so the path to leadership can be more varied. Moreover, sustainability is, by nature, an inclusive field. The job requires engagement with diverse stakeholders, so it makes sense that hiring managers would seek out people with diverse experience and backgrounds. However, while this has led to gender diversity, it has not yet supported racial diversity: Only 16 percent of U.S.-based sustainability professionals today identify as a race other than white.

Is this trend good or bad for women?
I have many anecdotes pointing to executive leadership clarifying their preference for a woman to hold their CSO position. It made me wonder: Is this trend going to create a pathway for female leadership in business? Or are women being pigeonholed in sustainability?

While the Morningstar report authors noted that women in business face a “glass wall” blocking them from career tracks with room for advancement and higher pay, it’s my belief that gender parity in the CSO role is a good thing. With the growing importance of ESG at global companies, the women in the CSO role have great potential to influence the future of business.

Moreover, women have the skills to excel in these roles. Whereas in business generally there’s the “glass cliff” phenomenon — whereby women are promoted into leadership positions during a crisis and then blamed when they fail — my sense is that women’s aptitude with communication, influence and agility will help them succeed in the CSO role.

Click here to read the full article on Green Biz.

Stop Telling Women They Have Imposter Syndrome
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graphics image of women taking off masks

Imposter syndrome is loosely defined as doubting your abilities and feeling like a fraud. It disproportionately affects high-achieving people, who find it difficult to accept their accomplishments. Many question whether they’re deserving of accolades.

Talisa Lavarry was exhausted. She had led the charge at her corporate event management company to plan a high-profile, security-intensive event, working around the clock and through weekends for months. Barack Obama was the keynote speaker.

Lavarry knew how to handle the complicated logistics required — but not the office politics. A golden opportunity to prove her expertise had turned into a living nightmare. Lavarry’s colleagues interrogated and censured her, calling her professionalism into question. Their bullying, both subtle and overt, haunted each decision she made. Lavarry wondered whether her race had something to do with the way she was treated. She was, after all, the only Black woman on her team. She began doubting whether she was qualified for the job, despite constant praise from the client.

Things with her planning team became so acrimonious that Lavarry found herself demoted from lead to co-lead and was eventually unacknowledged altogether by her colleagues. Each action that chipped away at her role in her work doubly chipped away at her confidence. She became plagued by deep anxiety, self-hatred, and the feeling that she was a fraud.

What had started as healthy nervousness — Will I fit in? Will my colleagues like me? Can I do good work? — became a workplace-induced trauma that had her contemplating suicide.

Today, when Lavarry reflects on the imposter syndrome she fell prey to during that time, she knows it wasn’t a lack of self-confidence that held her back. It was repeatedly facing systemic racism and bias.

Read the full article at HBR.

10 Women Scientists Leading the Fight Against the Climate Crisis
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Rose Mutiso speaks at TEDSummit: A Community Beyond Borders. July 2019, Edinburgh, Scotland. Photo: Bret Hartman / TED | Flickr/TED Conference

By Tshiamo Mobe, Global Citizen

Climate change is an issue that affects everyone on the planet but women and girls are the ones suffering its effects the most. Why? Because women and girls have less access to quality education and later, job opportunities. These structural disadvantages keep them in poverty. In fact, women make up 70% of the world’s poor. In a nutshell, climate change impacts the poor the most and the poor are mostly women.

Poverty is driven by and made worse by climate change also makes girls more susceptible to child marriage, because it drives hunger and girls getting married often means one less mouth to feed for their parents. Climate change also leads to geopolitical instability which, in turn, results in greater instances of violence — which we know disproportionately impacts women and girls.

Ironically, saving the planet has been made to seem a “women’s job”. This phenomenon, dubbed the “eco gender gap”, sees the burden of climate responsibility placed squarely on women’s shoulders through “green” campaigns and products that are overwhelmingly marketed to women.

There are several hypotheses for why this is. Firstly, women are the more powerful consumers (they drive 70-80% of all purchasing decisions). Secondly, they are disproportionately responsible, still, for the domestic sphere. And finally, going green is seen as a women’s job because women’s personalities are supposedly more nurturing and socially responsible.

Women should be involved in fighting the climate crisis at every level — from the kitchen to the science lab to the boardroom. Ruth Bader Ginsburg explained it best when she said: “Women belong in all places where decisions are being made.” However, women are underrepresented in the science field (including climate science), with just 30% of research positions held by women and fewer still holding senior positions. The Reuters Hot List of 1,000 scientists features just 122 women.

Click here to read the full article on Global Citizen.

The Fastest Growing Jobs of 2023
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Nurse Practitioner holding clipboard

The job market is as different as ever, especially given the events of the last several years. Whether you’re looking to enter the workforce for the first time or want to make a career switch, it can be easy to become discouraged in the search for a job that is financially and market secure. As we enter 2023, take a look at some of the highest paying and most in-demand careers of the year and what you need to get started.

Nurse Practitioner

Nurse practitioners are primary or specialty care providers, delivering advanced nursing services to patients and their families. They assess patients, determine how to improve or manage a patient’s health and discuss ways to integrate health promotion strategies into a patient’s life. Nurse practitioners typically care for a certain population of people. For instance, NPs may work in adult and geriatric health, pediatric health or psychiatric and mental health. While nurse practitioners are predicted to be one of the most in demand jobs of the next year, the healthcare field in its entirety is growing rapidly.

  • Education and Experience: Nurse practitioners usually need a master’s degree in an advanced practice nursing field. They must have a registered nursing license before pursuing education in one of the advanced practical roles. Working in administrative and managerial settings can also be a great way to gain experience and move up in the field.
  • Desired Skillset: Science education background, communication, detail-oriented, interpersonal skills
  • Average Salary: $127, 780
  • Job Growth Rate: 40% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 118,600

Data Scientist

Data scientists are responsible for using analytical tools, scientific methods and algorithms to collect and analyze useful information for companies and organizations. Data scientists additionally develop algorithms (sets of instructions that tell computers what to do) and models to support programs for machine learning. They use machine learning to classify or categorize data or to make predictions related to the models. Scientists also must test the algorithms and models for accuracy, including for updates with newly collected data.

  • Education and Experience: Data scientists typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in mathematics, statistics, computer science or a related field to enter the occupation. Some employers require industry-related experience or education. For example, data scientists seeking work in an asset management company may need to have experience in the finance industry or to have completed coursework that demonstrates an understanding of investments, banking or related subjects.
  • Desired Skillset: Analytics, mathematics, computer skills, problem-solving, industry specific knowledge
  • Average Salary: $100, 910
  • Job Growth Rate: 36% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 40,500

Information Security Analysts

Cybercrime is at an unfortunate all-time high. Since the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, cybercrime has skyrocketed by 600 percent, creating a greater need for workers in cybersecurity. Information security analysts are responsible for planning and carrying out security measures to protect an organization’s computer networks and systems. They work to maintain software, monitor networks, work closely with IT staff to execute the best protective measures and are heavily involved in creating their organization’s disaster recovery plan, a method of recovering lost data in a cybersecurity emergency.

  • Education and Experience: Information security analysts typically need a bachelor’s degree in a computer science field, along with related work experience. Many analysts have experience in IT. Employers additionally prefer hiring candidates that have their information security certification.
  • Desired Skillset: Established and evolving knowledge in IT, analytics, problem-solving, attention to detail
  • Average Salary: $102, 600
  • Job Growth Rate: 35% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 56,500

Financial Management

If math comes easy to you, the field of financial management won’t be slowing down any time soon. Financial managers are responsible for the financial health of an organization or individual. They create financial reports, analyze market trends, direct investment activities and develop plans for the long-term financial goals. They often work with teams, acting as advisors to managers and executives on the financial decisions of a company. Financial Managers may also have more specific titles for more specific roles such as controllers, treasurers, finance officers, credit managers and risk managers.

  • Education and Experience: Financial managers typically need at least a bachelor’s degree in business, economics or a related field. These disciplines help students learn analytical skills and methods. Although not required, earning professional certification is recommended for financial managers looking to provide tangible proof of their competence. Having job experience as a loan officer, accountant or related job may also be helpful in becoming a financial manager.
  • Desired Skillset: Mathematics, organization, communication skills, attention to detail
  • Average Salary: $131, 710
  • Job Growth Rate: 17% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 123,100

Computer and Information Research Scientists

Technology is advancing and its need exists in just about every industry. Computer and information research scientists design innovative uses for new and existing technology. They study and solve complex problems in computing for business, science, medicine and other fields. They design and conduct experiments to test the operation of software systems, frequently using techniques from data science and machine learning, often having expertise in programming and/or robotics.

  • Education and Experience: Computer and information research scientists typically need at least a master’s degree in computer science or a related field. In the federal government, a bachelor’s degree may be sufficient for some jobs.
  • Desired Skillset: Mathematics, logical thinking, IT and AI experience, analytics
  • Average Salary: $131,490
  • Job Growth Rate: 21% (higher than average 8%)
  • Estimated Jobs Added from 2021-2031: 7,100

Sources: US Bureau of Labor Statistics, Emeritus Blog, Wikipedia

Dressing for the Job You Want
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professional man and woman in office attire

By Natalie Rodgers

The saying “dress for the job you want” is still crucial advice when it comes to an interview. Even if you have the desired attributes and skillsets to your employer, wearing a sloppy or inappropriate outfit can greatly decrease your chances of being hired and being taken seriously. Picking the right outfit, however, will not only show your potential employer that you care for yourself and the occasion, but will give you the confidence to proceed through the interview as your best self. Here’s what you need to know when it comes to dressing for your interview day:

Do Your Research

Look into what kind of company you are interviewing with and what kind of clothing the day-to-day job would consist of. Depending on these answers, you may need to dress up or down a little more than your original outfit plans. If the workplace you’re applying to has a more relaxed environment, such as a startup company, you’ll probably be okay with dressing in something a little more business casual. However, if you’re applying to a big firm that requires a suit and tie, you might want to take on a more business formal wardrobe.

If you’re ever in doubt, it’s always a better idea to dress up then to dress down. Business casual is also a safe bet for most workplaces.

The Types of Dress

Before you do anything, you’ll want to know about the different kinds of professional dress, especially if a certain one has been requested by your interviewer. The types of outfits include:

Casual: If you are in a rare instance where casual apparel is acceptable for the workplace, this doesn’t necessarily mean it’s acceptable to wear a graphic t-shirt and a pair of shorts to your meeting. For a professional, yet casual look, you’ll want to wear something that is comfortable, but would also be acceptable to wear at a nice restaurant. For a professional casual interview, here are some fashion pieces you can pair together:

  • A button up shirt, polo or blouse free of logos, words and pictures. Patterns and design are okay, but make sure they aren’t too distracting
  • Dark jeans or pants
  • A knee length skirt or dress without patterns or designs that are too distracting
  • A plain colored cardigan
  • Clean closed-toe shoes

Business Casual: Business casual is one of the most common types of dress for an interview and a safe bet for just about any workplace interview. These outfits should be more dressed up than the “casual” outfit, but not fancy enough to wear to a wedding or formal event. Fashion items for a business causal outfit consist of:

  • Dark dress pants, slacks or pencil skirts
  • Button up shirts or blouses without logo, design and very limited pattern
  • A blazer, sportscoat or cardigan
  • Fancier closed toe shoes such as loafers, heels, flats or oxfords

Business Formal: Business formal is another step up from business causal and are typically outfits that can also be worn to events or places with more prestige. Law firms and many government positions usually include this kind of dress. The attire consists of:

  • Dark-colored, full suits
  • Suit pants or slim-fit, knee-length skirts
  • Blouses or button-down shirts accompanied by a jacket that preferably matches the bottom
  • Tailored dresses accompanied with a nice jacket
  • A tie
  • Fancier closed toe shoes such as loafers, heels, flats or oxfords

Hair, Makeup, Accessories

As there are many different kinds of hair and thus many different kinds of professional hairstyles, there is a wide variety for what is acceptable for a professional setting. Regardless of style, you’ll want to make sure that your hair is clean and kept.

As for makeup and accessories, both are acceptable and even encouraged for interviews, but you’ll want to make sure to keep both as simple as possible. Going for a more “natural” look is best for makeup and wearing jewelry that isn’t too bulky, noisy, distracting or inhibitive of normal body movements is best. You want to make sure that your focus is on the interview and not the discomfort of your clothes or accessories.

Clean it Up!

Before you throw on your big interview outfit, make sure that everything is clean and looks as pristine as possible. Make sure to iron your clothes (if needed), hang them up to prevent further wrinkling, free them of tags or loose strings and, above all, eliminate any negative odors.

Remember, your outfit should make you confident and compliment the experience and skillset that you know will benefit this workplace. Now go get them!

Sources: Indeed, The Balance Money

20 Latina Business Influencers to Follow Today
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collage of latina influencers

Originally posted on Hispanic Executive

There are countless Latina influencers out there who have cultivated passionate followings on social media, but it takes a special type of influencer to build both a brand and a business.

And here at Hispanic Executive, we love nothing better than celebrating entrepreneurship.

Meet the Latina business influencers who are transforming their communities—and the world itself.

 

 

 

Retail

1. Ada V. Rojas, CEO and Founder, Vecina Couture

Ada V. Rojas is a mission-driven entrepreneur: all of her business efforts have reflected her desire to celebrate her Dominican American heritage and uplift other ambitious women. Her latest endeavor is Vecina Couture, a luxury loungewear line that’s been spotlighted by Oprah DailyEssenceRefinery29, and other top outlets.

2. Paola Alberdi, Founder and Creative Director, Blank Itinerary

Paola Alberdi knows fashion. She’s worked with the likes of Chanel, Dior, Gucci, Coach, and Dolce & Gabbana, not to mention lifestyle and beauty brands like Sephora and Givenchy Beauty.

Today, the Mexican American serves as founder and creative director of Blank Itinerary, a bilingual fashion and lifestyle platform that’s earned Alberdi recognition from ForbesVogue México, and Harper’s Bazaar.

3. Julie Sariñana, Founder, Color Dept.

Julie Sariñana created clean nail care company Color Dept. to be a one-stop shop for nail art aficionados “who love to be different.” All Color Dept. products feature bold, vibrant colors and are made with wheat, potato, manioc, and corn rather than chemicals and plastics.

In addition to her work with Color Dept., Sariñana runs a popular fashion blog called Sincerely Jules.

4. Julissa Prado, Founder and CEO, Rizos Curls

Afro-Mexican Julissa Prado spent years fighting her curly hair. She was never happy with how it looked, and she never found any hair products that helped.

In the years since then, she’s not only embraced her hair but created a clean, high-quality line of products designed for all curl types. Prado and Rizos Curls have been featured in People en EspañolPopSugar, and Forbes.

5. Cyndi Ramirez, Founder and CEO, Chillhouse

A serial entrepreneur with a background in fashion, marketing, lifestyle branding, and hospitality, Cyndi Ramirez has been featured by Refinery29Martha Stewart Magazine, theSkimm, and Hispanic Executive.

Her latest venture, Chillhouse, is a “multi-point retail concept” that has revolutionized the spa world. Chillhouse offers a wellness-focused self-care experience that includes a workspace, nail art studio, and massage boutique—a true getaway for those in need of deep relaxation.

5. Camila Coelho, CEO and Founder, Camila Coelho Collection

Beauty and fashion influencer Camila Coelho has not one but two businesses: her eponymous clean clothing line Camila Coelho Collection and a clean beauty brand called Elaluz. Her entrepreneurial spirit has earned her features in both Elle and Forbes.

The Brazilian American is also passionate about destigmatizing neurological disorders—she’s been battling epilepsy since the age of nine.

6. Irma Martinez, Founder and Creative Director, Trendy Inc.

A true icon in the fashion world, Ima Martinez has worked with celebrities like Sofia Vergara, Ricky Martin, Shakira, and Enrique Iglesias, to name but a few. Her company, Trendy Inc., specializes in lifestyle services for the production and entertainment industries. Martinez also offers advisory and coaching services as well as courses on the business of personal shopping and styling.

Read more about her career in Hispanic ExecutivePeople en Español, the Miami New Times, and Poder magazine.

Consulting

1. Eva Hughes, Founder and CEO, Adira Consulting

Eva Hughes was a huge name in the luxury and media spaces—she served as editor-in-chief of VogueMéxico y Latinoamérica and as CEO of Condé Nast México y Latinoamérica—before she struck out on her own in January 2018. Her company, Adira Consulting, offers brand strategy advice to clients that primarily come from the luxury sector. She also offers group and individual coaching services.

As noted in her Hispanic Executive feature, Adira is Hebrew for “strong, noble, powerful.”

2. Victoria Jenn Rodriguez, Founder, Dare to Leap Academy

Victoria Jenn Rodriguez is a business coach and serial entrepreneur who left her high-powered career in the corporate world to start a company of her own.

Her newest business is called the Dare to Leap Academy: it’s an online learning platform where Rodriguez teaches other women how to leave corporate America behind to follow their passions—without giving up their financial stability. Learn more about her in her Hispanic Executive story.

Fitness and Health

1. Michelle Lewin, Founder, One0One

Venezuelan American Michelle Lewin is one of the biggest names in the fitness world: she is a model, bodybuilder, and cover star for magazines like OxygenPlayboy, and Muscle & Fitness Hers.

Lewin is also an entrepreneur. She sells health supplements, clothing, and gym accessories and equipment through her website and has her own personal training app.

Continue on to Hispanic Executive to view the full list.

Why We Need More Women in Engineering: A Conversation with SWE Emerging Leader Kia Smith
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Kia Smith headshot

Diversity is important in every field, but this can especially be true in STEM. Having a diverse team allows for a wider exchange of thought, ideas and ways to problem-solve inspired by a variety of different life experiences and trains of thought.

But even with the progress that has been made to include more women and people of color in STEM, they are still vastly underrepresented, especially in the engineering field. In the most recent survey done by the Society of Women Engineers, women represented only 34 percent of all STEM workers and only 14 percent of all engineering occupations.

These numbers were even lower for women of color in the field.

Getting more women — particularly diverse women — in engineering is incredibly important, but don’t just take our word for it. Diversity in STEAM Magazine sat down with the 2022 Society of Women Engineers Emerging Leader and the 2022 Black Engineer of the Year, Kia Smith, to talk about her journey in engineering and why it’s important for voices like hers to be included this field:

Diversity in STEAM Magazine (DISM): When did you know that you wanted to become an engineer and why?

Kia Smith (KS): I knew once I sat down and reviewed all the possibilities of majors that I could have for college at 15 years old. I sat down with my dad and we reviewed my top three. We ranked them on how much school I had to take versus how much money I could make. Needless to say, with my love for math and science and data from the assessment, all signs pointed to STEM!

DISM: What types of challenges have you faced as a woman of color in the engineering field?

KS: I have had managers that made each day hard, people at work that acted like supporters who really used my kindness for weakness and friends (or people that I thought were my friends) turn on me for getting a career. While all hard, I realized everything is temporary and nothing is forever so I need to make decisions for me that will lead to my happiness no matter what.

DISM: Tell us a bit more about your role at Boeing and what you enjoy most about it?

KS: I am a Regional Supplier Quality Manager in the California Region for Boeing Space, Defense and Security. I lead 15 people and close to 200 Supplier’s product verifications in the Southern California area and internationally. What I enjoy most is the training and development of team members. My team is great and I love to see them happy and growing.

DISM: What does it mean to you to be recognized by the Society of Women Engineers, BEYA and so many more?

KS: It means the world. I wish my parents were alive to see it. For years I thought my efforts were not noticed or appreciated, which I was told many times does not matter if you are getting paid. This is far from the truth. Recognition is definitely aligned with my words of affirmation love language, so you can imagine the level of gratefulness and excitement that I am on this year.

DISM: Why do you believe women are integral in engineering?

KS: Our ability to think and reactive differently has always been misunderstood but today it is celebrated more than ever. Our ability to multitask and bring a different flavor to the table makes our teams that much more amazing. I believe this makes US integral in engineering, which is a function embedded in all that we do each day — whether it is Wi-Fi from satellites that I have personally worked on, cell phones, ordering an Uber or Amazon delivery or riding on an airplane. Safety, quality and efficiency are all minimal expectations in the world we live in and it takes diversity on engineering teams for this to happen.

DISM: What advice would you give another woman of color who wants to pursue a career in engineering?

KS: Go for it and let nothing get in your way! You are worthy, you are good enough and you will make a difference in this world! Never tell yourself no… let other people say it and then go around them and make it happen!

Photo Credit: Courtesy of Kia Smith

Revamping your Resume for the New Year
LinkedIn
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Starting your new year with a job search? Use these tips to infuse your resume with energy and communicate a clear story about what you can bring to your next job.

Create a personal brand to show employers your uniqueness.

Personal branding is about communicating your identity and showing what sets you apart from others in your field. It combines the personal with the professional, since a brand encompasses your skills and talents, along with personality and style.

When competing for a job, you need to stand out. Besides helping you identify your personal strengths, having a brand can pull your resume to the top of the pile, make you shine in interviews and leave your social media readers positively wowed.

Are you ready to start thinking — or re-thinking — your personal branding strategy?

Consider several of your best work experiences and how you contributed to them. What skill or characteristic is reflected in your best work stories? How did you use it? With what result? Ask yourself: “Why do people like to work with me or employ me?” What earns you compliments or accolades? What do people depend on you for?

Here are two examples to get you started:

  • Do you take unusual care to ensure details are thoroughly thought through and accurate? Your brand could be “willing to take on the precision that scares others away.”
  • You might be an outstanding supervisor who makes operations flow and brand yourself “a problem solver who excels at developing talent.”

Your transferable skills are a major selling point; make sure to highlight them.

An important part of what makes you valuable to an employer is your skillset. There are probably some skills unique to your particular work history; take time to note these and include in your resume.

Transferable skills are those that are used in many different careers and help make you an attractive job candidate. If you have a hard time coming up with a list of skills, take a skills assessment or try listing the key tasks from your previous jobs and highlight the verbs — or action words — you wrote down.

Promote your accomplishments to advertise what you can achieve.

The first thing an employer wants to learn from a resume is “how could this person help my organization?” Your resume should give the employer a clear answer by including your accomplishments.

Think about what you did in past jobs. What problems did you solve? What solutions did you come up with? What benefits did this have for the business, customers or employees? Think in terms of the challenge you confronted, the action you took to resolve it and the end result and how it benefitted the employer.

Tailor your resume to get through the initial resume review conducted by applicant tracking systems software.

Many employers use applicant tracking system (ATS) software to make an initial sort of resumes; the software indicates whether or not a resume should move on to human resources staff for further review.

For a given position, employers specify in the ATS the skills, education and training, years of experience and other details needed to qualify candidates for a position. As applications are received, the ATS scores each one and puts it in rank order based on how well it meets the employer’s list of criteria.

But unlike a human reader, the software is likely to reject resumes because:

  • Qualified candidates fail to use the employer’s chosen keywords.
  • The system doesn’t recognize unusual fonts or formatting.
  • Candidates lack the preferred experience, but may have qualifications that could make up for what’s missing.

Be precise

While including all of the above is important, remember that no one wants to read a twenty-page resume. Be informative yet concise with your resume, keeping your qualifications within the perimeters of two pages. Think of resumes as the plot descriptor on the back of a book, they are an initial look at who you are, not a detailed explanation of every detail of the book. A good rule of thumb is to keep your resume to a maximum of two full pages.

Source: CareerOneStop

Should Your Company Invest in Supplier Diversity Programs? The Answer is Yes.
LinkedIn
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By Yvette Montoya

When we consider the state of the United States in 2022 both socially and economically, it’s clear that our demographic is shifting and that Americans believe that social responsibility is more important than ever.

Companies that want to stay relevant in this economy need to prioritize diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) programs and initiatives. A 2017 Cone Communications CSR study stated that 87 percent of consumers would purchase a product that aligned with their own values, and 76 percent would boycott a brand if it supported an issue that went against their beliefs. So, it’s a good time for companies to evaluate what their corporate social responsibility (CSR) looks like and where it needs improvement.

There are four types of corporate social responsibility: Environmental, philanthropic, ethical and economic responsibility– and supplier diversity programs have the potential to achieve all four categories. In a world that’s increasingly looking to employers to create stability and treat employees fairly, supplier diversity programs not only give companies a competitive edge but also make them more likely to maintain high standards of ethics. Implementing diversity, equity and inclusion (DEI) positions businesses to create a positive experience for employees, vendors and the community at large.

Here are three reasons why every company should take supplier diversity programs seriously:

  1. You Get to Be a Leader in Social Responsibility

Companies that choose to focus intentionally on investing in Black and Latinx, women-owned, and LGBTQ+ businesses build trust with their customer base and inspire other business leaders to examine their own company practices. When we create transparency related to how products are sourced and/or hiring and management practices, we put our money where our mouth is, and so will your customers. According to Cone Communications, three out of five Americans believe that companies should spearhead social and environmental change. And eighty-seven percent of Americans said they’d buy a product because a company advocated for an issue they care about.

Although there may be some challenges in finding minority-owned vendors that comply with a buyer’s procurement requirements, there are two solutions to this. One being creating mentoring and training programs for diverse suppliers to help them meet the standards of the certification process. The other is to partner with relevant councils and chambers of commerce that provide these support systems. When value is created through tangible solutions, everyone wins.

  1. Investing in DEI will Foster Innovation and Sales

Treating DEI like an option or something that isn’t deserving of attention means that customers will see that you’re not taking your CSR seriously. Corporate social responsibility initiatives can be the best public relations — as well as marketing — tool. Gen Z and Millennials are experts at spotting inauthenticity. A company that positions authentically with real company-wide efforts and accountability will be viewed favorably in the eyes of consumers, investors and regulators. Honest initiatives attract opportunities and employees that match an organization’s convictions.

CSR initiatives can also improve employee engagement and satisfaction — key measures that drive retention. Finally, corporate social responsibility initiatives by nature force business leaders to examine practices related to how they hire and manage employees, source products or components and deliver value to customers. All of these things create happy employees and customers, which lead to innovation, sales and a good reputation.

  1. You Get to Make an Impact on Structural Inequality in America

Supplier diversity programs are a catalyst for true social impact because thriving small businesses are the lifeblood of the American economy. Strong local businesses create jobs and higher wages, which put money back into the community and drive economic growth. Another plus of supplier diversity is the impact it will have on the company at large and the economy overall. Supplier diversity promotes healthy competition by increasing the pool of possible suppliers. This can lead to potentially lower costs and a better product quality. Not only that, bringing in people from different backgrounds or from backgrounds that reflect the community your company serves can result in better marketing, unique solutions to old problems, as well as innovative ways to meet your customer’s needs.

With midterm elections underway, it’s a good idea for businesses to be on the right side of key issues, including racial and gender equality and environmental sustainability. This gives corporations the opportunity to work collaboratively with businesses in a way that combats racial discrimination, all while empowering the public, creating economic opportunity and enhancing their business.

Yvette Montoya is a Los Angeles native and journalist who is equal parts content creator and writer. She covers everything from issues of spirituality and politics to beauty and entertainment. Her journalistic work has been featured on Refinery29, Teen Vogue, ArtBound, HipLatina, Mitu, and she’s a regular contributor for POPSUGAR.

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Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fairs Schedule for 2023
    January 26, 2023 - November 1, 2023
  2. NAWBO Leadership Academy–Winter 2023
    February 6, 2023 - February 7, 2023
  3. 2023 NAWBO Leadership Academy
    February 6, 2023 - February 7, 2023
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    February 8, 2023
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    February 16, 2023 - February 18, 2023
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    February 23, 2023 - December 13, 2023
  7. CSUN 38th Annual Assistive Technology Conference
    March 13, 2023 - March 17, 2023
  8. CSUN Assistive Technology Conference
    March 13, 2023 - March 17, 2023

Upcoming Events

  1. City Career Fairs Schedule for 2023
    January 26, 2023 - November 1, 2023
  2. NAWBO Leadership Academy–Winter 2023
    February 6, 2023 - February 7, 2023
  3. 2023 NAWBO Leadership Academy
    February 6, 2023 - February 7, 2023
  4. From Day One: Houston 2023
    February 8, 2023
  5. National Association of African American Studies & Affiliates (NAAAS) Conference
    February 16, 2023 - February 18, 2023