RuPaul’s Drag Race star Laganja Estranja comes out as trans: ‘I feel so beautiful’
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'RuPaul's Drag Race' queen Laganja Estranja comes out as trans in EW's exclusive interview.

By Joey Nolfi, EW

RuPaul’s Drag Race legend Laganja Estranja is chassé-ing into a new chapter of her life as an out, proud trans woman. “There are so many other women around me who’ve inspired me to come forward today, and it’s because of their fight and their struggle that I’m able to really do this and say that I’m nervous, but I’m not scared,” the 32-year-old recording artist and cannabis activist exclusively reveals to EW. “I’m not going to live my life in fear anymore.” Estranja says after “presenting as female for the last 10 years” as a drag performer, she eased into her identity while on the stage in a way that “made it more explainable to the masses,” but, in 2021, she’s living her truth for one person only: Herself.

“I do want to be able to express this at all times,” she continues. “I just got my haircut – a very feminine cut – and in one week already, my life has changed. I’m able to come off stage and take my makeup off and still see a beautiful woman in the mirror. It’s powerful.”

The Texas native, who rose to prominence thanks to her flamboyant personality on season 6 of RuPaul’s Drag Race in 2014, says she came out to her “incredibly supportive” family one week ago, but has been “comfortably, fully committing” to who she is as a trans woman among her inner circle for one year, after previously revealing her truth to friends on her birthday in 2020.

Without a prompt, she volunteers information about her physical transformation, stressing that it’s important for her to highlight this part of her story – which involves deliberately coming out before beginning hormone therapy – to emphasize that no one’s transition is the same, and that everyone deserves the space, time, and love to come out on their own terms, at any age, and at any physical point on their personal trajectory.

“That will come,” she says, later explaining: “Glam doesn’t make you a woman; it makes you a woman to people outside, in the world…. gender is performative, and what we wear is an extension of what we feel on the inside. That’s the real truth here: once this is out and once people know, I’m going to be more free to explore what it means to be a woman on the inside. The dressing part? I’ve got it down, but that’s not what makes you a woman.”

For Estranja, getting to a place of comfort took time. She says she first told others she was nonbinary as both an easing-in for her and those around her, because she often felt trapped by the pressure to fit into the constraints of constructed gender.

“People think that when you’re trans that you’ve wanted to be a girl your whole life; yes, that’s partly true [for me], but it’s also true that I’ve wanted to be male my whole life to fit into what society deems as normal,” she explains. “But, that isn’t my truth, and I’m daring to take this on. I tried to be male and be in-between and nonbinary. The truth is I’m a feminine entity and I can live this life.”

Still, her transition will be an ode to the person that laid the foundation for this moment over the last three decades of life. She doesn’t plan to change her drag name or her birth name; she’ll still perform as Laganja Estranja, and go by Jay among those closest to her, so she feels like she’s “not turning [her] back on” the bricks that built the woman she is today – many of which, she reveals, came to her in unexpected ways, like the time she remembers feeling her natural hair growing long enough to touch her neck for the first time last year, when the global pandemic interrupted her regular two-week haircut schedule.

“When my real hair started growing, I remember it touching the back of my neck, and that’s funny, because wigs have touched the back of my neck forever, but it was my real hair; my real truth was physically touching me in a way,” she recalls.

She shares that something as simple as performing drag with her natural hair versus a wig has drawn criticism from cis members of the community in the past – something that’s “not fair,” though she’s prepared herself for it by watching her Drag Race season 6 castmate and close friend, Gia Gunn, while the pair lived together.

“I feel blessed to have had that experience. Our transitions are different and will manifest in different ways, but it was so incredible to see someone live their truth and to be happy,” says Estranja, who joins past Drag Race contestants like Gunn, Gottmik, Peppermint, Kylie Sonique Love, Jiggly Caliente, and Carmen Carrera, among others, who’ve come out either before, during, or after their time on the show.

“I’m so thankful that Gia didn’t push me and has allowed me to take my time,” Estranja says. “Of course she’s encouraged me. From day one when we met, she was like, ‘Oh honey, you’re a woman!’ She’s known longer than I have!”

Click here to read the full article on EW.

How misogynoir is oppressing Black women athletes
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Black female track athletes

By Hannah Ryan, CNN

Naomi Osaka discovered what it’s like to be at the sharp end of a sporting governing body’s regulations this summer.

The ​four-time grand slam singles champion declined to ​attend press conferences as she began her French Open campaign in June — citing the importance of protecting her mental health and addressing the toll that media interviews had previously taken on her.

The French Open organizers responded by fining the world No. 2 an amount of $15,000 and threatening to expel her from future grand slams, after they deemed her withdrawal from press conferences as a failure on her part to meet “contractual media obligations.”

Osaka made the decision to withdraw from Roland Garros altogether, then skipped Wimbledon, before returning to play at the Tokyo Olympics.

What’s happened to Osaka over the last few months has left many ​critical of her sport’s handling of the situation, and wishing those who govern her sport ​had adopted a more empathetic and sensitive approach given ​she was dealing with mental health issues.

In fact, just after Osaka said she would be opting out of speaking to the press at the tournament, the French Open official Twitter account posted a since-deleted tweet that included photos of four other players engaging in media duties — Coco Gauff, Kei Nishikori, Aryna Sablenka and Rafael Nadal — which carried the caption: “They understood the assignment.”

The tweet appeared to be directed at Osaka and her decision to withdraw from media obligations. It was considered by several former tennis players and pundits as insensitive, and former doubles champion Rennae Stubbs said that the post could make Osaka “feel guilty” and described it as “humiliating” for her.

And while the rule itself — in which players are required to engage in press conferences throughout the tournament — ​may not be a racist or misogynistic one, the context in which Osaka found herself ​punished and seemingly mocked by officials is part of a pattern in which Black women in ​elite sports are subject to harsh scrutiny.

The rigidity with which Roland Garros responded to Osaka’s decision is reminiscent of the scrutiny that tennis ​governing bodies have previously bestowed upon other prominent players, including Serena Williams.

Osaka is a young, Black ​and Japanese athlete whose decision at the French Open is considered outside of the box by many. Her refusal to play by the traditional rules has seen her face backlash across the board in a particular right-wing media landscape that doesn’t look too fondly on Black women that diverge from the expected path.
And tennis has a history in the way it has dealt with Black women who do things differently.

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

Dolly Parton says she used royalties from Whitney Houston’s song in ‘The Bodyguard’ to support a Black neighborhood
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Dolly Parton pictures at the country music awards

By , Insider

Dolly Parton’s 1973 song “I Will Always Love You” found a new generation of fans when Whitney Houston took on the song for her 1992 movie “The Bodyguard.”

Houston’s version became one of the best-selling singles of all time and led to Parton pocketing $10 million through the 1990s in royalties, according to Forbes. Those earnings have only grown through the decades, especially following Houston’s death in 2012 when the song re-entered the charts.

So how has Parton spent that money? According to the country music legend, she used it to help a Black community in Nashville.

“I bought my big office complex down in Nashville,” she told Andy Cohen on Thursday’s episode of “Watch What Happens Live” (via Yahoo). “So I thought, ‘well this is a wonderful place to be.'”

“I bought a property down in what was the Black area of town, and it was mostly just Black families and people that lived around there,” she continued. “And it was off the beaten path from 16th avenue and I thought, ‘Well I am going to buy this place, the whole strip mall.’ And thought, ‘This is the perfect place for me to be,’ considering it was Whitney.”
“So I just thought this was great, I’m just gonna be down here with her people, who are my people as well,” Parton said. “And so I just love the fact that I spent that money on a complex. And I think, ‘This is the house that Whitney built.'”

In a November appearance on Apple TV+’s “The Oprah Conversation,” Parton recalled what it was like to hear Houston’s rendition of “I Will Always Love You” for the first time. She explained that she unexpectedly heard the song on the radio when she was driving and didn’t immediately realize it was her song.

“I was shot so full of adrenaline and energy, I had to pull off, because I was afraid that I would wreck, so I pulled over quick as I could to listen to that whole song,” Parton told Winfrey, according to Yahoo. “I could not believe how she did that. I mean, how beautiful it was that my little song had turned into that, so that was a major, major thing.”

Click here to read the full article on Insider.

‘Sex and the City’ Revival Casts Miranda and Charlotte’s Kids
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Sex and the City revival to include daughters and son of characters

Cathy Ang, Niall Cunningham, Alexa Swinton, and Cree Cicchino have joined the cast of the HBO Max original series and revival of “Sex and the City.” Entitled “And Just Like That…,” the 10-episode TV sequel follows Carrie (Sarah Jessica Parker), Miranda (Cynthia Nixon), and Charlotte (Kristin Davis) as they navigate the journey from the complicated reality of life and friendship in their 30s to the even more complicated reality of life and friendship in their 50s. The groundbreaking HBO series “Sex and the City” was created by Darren Star and based on the book “Sex and the City” by Candace Bushnell.

The half-hour series is currently shooting in New York and is executive produced by Parker, Davis, Nixon and Julie Rottenberg, Elisa Zuritsky, John Melfi, and Michael Patrick King. Writers include King, Samantha Irby, Rachna Fruchbom, Keli Goff, Rottenberg, and Zuritsky. The previously announced cast includes Sara Ramírez, Sarita Choudhury, Nicole Ari Parker, Karen Pittman, Chris Noth, Mario Cantone, David Eigenberg, Willie Garson, and Evan Handler.

Ang (“Over the Moon,” “My Best Friend’s Exorcism,” “Ramy”) will play the role of Lily Goldenblatt; Cunningham (“Life in Pieces,” Curb Your Enthusiasm,” “Deadbeat”) will appear as Brady Hobbes; Swinton (“Old,” “Billions,” “Emergence”) will play Rose Goldenblatt; Cicchino (“Mr. Iglesias,” “The Sleepover”) will appear as Brady Hobbes’ girlfriend, Luisa Torres.

Ang is repped by ICM Partners, Authentic Talent & Literary Management, and Viewpoint; Cunningham is repped by Paradigm and Brillstein Entertainment Partners; Swinton is repped by A3 Artists Agency, Edge Entertainment Management, and Lichter, Grossman, Nichols, Adler, Feldman & Clark; Cicchino is repped by A3 Artists Agency, Circle of Confusion, and Goodman, Genow, Schenkman, Smelkinson & Christopher.

Click here to read the full article on Variety.

Mena Suvari: “Slowly but Surely Meth Became My Life. And Then It Took Over”
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Mena Suvari pictured in a black and white photo holding her hand by her bottom lip and staring at the camera

By Mena Suvari, Yahoo! Life

Nineties It Girl Mena Suvari, who you recognize from hugely popular movies American Pie and American Beauty, is coming clean about her double life. In her new memoir, The Great Peace, the award-winning actor divulges intimate, moving, and, at times, shocking details about her off-camera world—including her teenage struggles with drug addiction, her emotionally destructive relationships with older men, and how the #MeToo movement ultimately inspired her to share her experience with the dark side of young Hollywood fame.

Below, read the chapter “Meth Month” from Mena’s debut memoir, out today.

Back home, I met up with Gabby one day in Burbank. She had a different group of friends from Burbank High, none of whom I had met before. I guessed things with her had changed while I was off doing the movie and hanging with Geoff and Franny, because instead of a casual let’s-smoke-some-pot vibe, we ended up at one of her friends’ houses and the darkness reappeared.

There it was again. I couldn’t believe it. How had it found me here in L.A.? Slowly but surely it became my life. And then it took over my life. The hours I was at school were spent thinking about getting out of school and doing some lines. I stayed up until late at night, slept a couple hours, then repeated the day. Before long I was pulling out my small gold lacquered butterfly embossed compact mirror and snorting a line in the school bathroom during a break. Later, I sat up all night playing eclectic indie rock on a large old-school boombox recorder Gabby had given me.

A part of meth made me hyper-aware, but there was that other part that was like the dark side of the road, and it led directly to paranoia. I spent a lot of the night waiting to hear whether anyone was going to knock on my bedroom door. While I maintained my grades, my health suffered. My entire back broke out in acne. I’d always had perfect skin. I knew it was the meth. And just like before with the birth control offered in exchange for no questions asked, I was given antibiotics to make it “go away.”

Years later, when I talked to my mother about this time when she left, she said that I had told her that I hated her. Maybe I did. At the time, I felt like no one cared about me. The drugs certainly didn’t help. But I hadn’t wanted to hear the things she had told me about my father and I absolutely couldn’t handle the situation we were currently in, so I probably did hate her for abandoning me to that situation, although I didn’t want to.

I didn’t want to be at home.

I didn’t want to see my father the way he was at that time. I wasn’t even sure who he was or had ever been.

I stayed out as much as I could. And stayed high as much as I could.

I still did everything asked of me. Schoolwork. Auditions. Sex. Only I had to know how fucked up I was getting every day. I thought I could, and should, suffer in silence. This was obviously my fate. I prayed someone would throw me a lifeline. I was ready every single day to be rescued. It never happened.

One day I scored some shit and went back to the apartment. I sat on my carpeted bedroom floor in front of the sliding mirrored closet doors and looked at the baggie. There was a small amount of powder in it, but it had a slight grey tinge that made me question it. Nonetheless, I cut it up, exhaled, and abruptly inhaled it into my nose. It had the burn I was pretty much used to, but as I sat there I realized it had done nothing. And I thought, What the fuck did I just put up my nose?

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life

How to Mitigate Pandemic Fatigue
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By Susan Au Allen: National President & CEO, US Pan Asian American Chamber of Commerce Education Foundation (USPAACC)

The vaccines are here. This marks a critical turning point — a year into the pandemic — in the fight against a virulent disease that has wreaked months-long havoc to lives and livelihood.

Millions of Americans have already been vaccinated from COVID-19; millions more are awaiting their turn. This is welcome news that brings renewed optimism.

Our collective jubilation, however, is tempered by caveats from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Experts estimate that the United States is still months away from reaching the threshold of herd immunity.

To cut the chain of transmission, at least 70% of the U.S. population — or over 200 million people — would have to recover from the illness and achieve natural immunity or undergo vaccinations. According to CDC, only 7.9% of the U.S. population — or just over 26 million people — have been given the recommended two doses.

This sobering reality is compounded by the arrival of highly contagious variants — increasing exponentially — which could spark new outbreaks and undermine vaccination progress. This does not augur well for the public sentiment that has been aching to return to a semblance of normalcy.

First the Fear, Now the Fatigue

In the early days of the pandemic, as the infection spiked, fear was foremost in everyone’s mind. Few questioned government-imposed lockdowns, restrictions of unfettered movements, enforced social distancing and other health protocols. Public compliance was high.

Today, more than a year later, the public attitude has changed: fear has been supplanted by fatigue. People have become more relaxed due to collective boredom, exhaustion, impatience or a sense of apathy — a phenomenon experts refer to as “pandemic fatigue.”

Uncertainty, a sense of lack of control and limited options fuel anxiety. This leads to profound shifts in social and work behaviors, as well as consumer preferences. Humans — social animals who are naturally in need of constant contact with each other — will keep on seeking out one another.

Signs are everywhere: recent outbreaks have been traced to bars, restaurants and air travel. An exhausted public has begun to disregard health protocols. This trend will continue.

What likely emerges next is a vicious cycle. When the public lets its guard down, health protocols will be broken. This will then trigger more infections. Eventually, this will lead to more restrictions — and pandemic fatigue will worsen.

The Business of Coping

There simply is no available playbook in corporate America and government today that offers guidance on how to effectively handle pandemic fatigue. Psychologists counsel that the art of mitigating pandemic-related fatigue begins with accepting the current reality.

It is also important to accept that the adaptations in how people work these days could become protracted or even permanent. With workflow significantly disrupted, output and morale are at their nadir. Employees have hit the motivational wall. Social calendars are wiped clean. Small talk among office colleagues — including spontaneous gossip sessions next to the water cooler — is replaced by seemingly interminable, back-to-back video calls that ironically lead many to feel more disconnected than ever.

Since the work-from-home set-up began, employees have also noticed that their working hours have been stretched. They struggle to follow a structured work schedule. It is difficult to set and adhere to work-related parameters at home, in part because they worry that they will lose their job or be seen as weak contributors to the team effort. These amorphous work boundaries, plus the associated stress, contribute to the energy drain among the workforce.

In response, companies of every size are bringing out myriad new initiatives from their arsenal to support their employees. A host of activities are offered that focus on connection, care and the well-being of staff — often ranging from tailored wellness programs to virtual happy hours. Managers are clearing their calendars to make themselves available for informal, agenda-free connections. Others are allowing employees to take more time off.

But more needs to be done. Organizations must empower teams, simplify unnecessary bureaucracy and enable a faster decision-making process. Conduct listening tours to take the pulse of employees and assess their needs. Apply innovative, best-practice work-from-home models. Help prioritize available work, put a pause on the introduction of new projects, limit work in progress and allow for respite and recovery.

Individually, employees must slow down. Keep a sense of calm and focus. Stave off ennui by virtually reaching out to a community with shared interests, such as gardening, painting and other hobbies. Take periodic breaks to replenish energy. Try breathing exercises and meditation, go for a stroll, read a book, engage in online shopping or “retail therapy,” etc. Channel fatigue into meaningful and creative endeavors.

Further, limit access to social media and avoid tuning in to negative stories on television that raise stress and anxiety levels. Do not let negativity foster.

The Untrodden Path to the ‘Next Normal’

A sense of loss is at the heart of pandemic fatigue — the loss of control in our daily life, work, business, finances, travel, important events, opportunities and more. On a personal level, it is the loss of connection to our family, friends, peers and community.

Understandably, stress levels remain high and taking their toll. According to Nielsen data, alcohol sales in the U.S. are up 23 percent.

As the U.S. crosses yet another grim milestone with over half a million deaths from COVID-19, the country’s policymakers have the daunting task of trying to deflate the rate of infection. They face a tenuous balancing act: enforcing a range of restrictions while weighing public health-related and economic repercussions.

Compliance wanes as pandemic fatigue spreads. Worse, as more people get vaccinated, many become more complacent and tempted to disregard precautions. Some take their cues from several state leaders who have announced the easing of restrictions, including the lifting of mask mandates and allowing businesses to open at full capacity.

Susan Allen headshot smiling wearing glasses and pink blouse with a black blazer
Susan Au Allen

The vaccines are no panacea for this contagion. If the public fails to adhere to minimum public health standards, it will only aggravate the current situation. To avoid reaching the tipping point of yet another coronavirus surge, safety measures must remain and be heeded. It is up to a conscientious public to do its share to ensure that our collective journey through this untrodden path to the “next normal” will be smooth, safe and healthy.

Susan Au Allen came to the United States from Hong Kong on an invitation from the White House in recognition of her volunteer work for people with disabilities. She received her Juris Doctor from the Antioch School of Law and LL.M. in International Law from Georgetown University. During her 17 years with Paul Shearman Allen & Associates of Washington, D.C. and Hong Kong, she became nationally recognized for her work on immigration, international trade and investment. Once an immigrant, she knows the obstacles that one must be overcome to achieve the American Dream, and she has dedicated her life to help entrepreneurs to pursue their Dream — develop, grow and build a successful business.

Trans model makes Sports Illustrated swimsuit cover history: ‘If you don’t like it, you can go somewhere else’
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Leyna Bloom first transgender to pose during the 2021 Sports Illustrated Swimsuit Cover Reveal at Jack Studios in New York. (Dimitrios Kambouris/Getty Images/Sports Illustrated Swimsuit)

By Jonathan Edwards, The Washington Post

Leyna Bloom says she was raped as a child, sexually fetishized her entire life and forced to hide who she really was. Now, she’s the first transgender woman on the cover of Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit issue, celebrated as “a symbol of beauty.”

Bloom, a 27-year-old model, actress and dancer, is one of three women to appear on the 2021 edition’s cover when it hits stands later this week, the magazine announced on Monday. The others are tennis star Naomi Osaka, 23, and rapper Megan Thee Stallion, 26.

“This moment heals a lot of pain in the world. We deserve this moment,” Bloom said on Instagram. “… Many girls like us don’t have the chance to live our dreams, or to live long at all. I hope my cover empowers those, who are struggling to be seen, feel valued.”

Last month, Bloom told Variety that before coming out seven years ago, she was terrified people would discover she was transgender. She hid her identity because she believed the world wasn’t ready and that someone might attack her.

“They see how you move, they see your magic [and] they want to hurt you,” she said.

But in 2014, Bloom announced herself to the world by modeling for a magazine shoot featuring her and other trans women. Since then, she became one of the first openly trans women to walk the runway at Paris Fashion Week, Sports Illustrated said on its website.

Other milestones followed: She was the first trans woman of color on the cover of Vogue India and the first trans woman of color to star in a movie at the Cannes Film Festival — “Port Authority,” a Martin Scorsese-produced tale about a fresh-off-the-bus cisgender man who stumbles into New York City’s queer ballroom scene and falls in love with Bloom’s character. Earlier this year, Sports Illustrated announced Bloom would be the first trans woman of color modeling in the magazine’s swimsuit issue, although the revelation about the cover would take four more months.

Having a trans woman held up as a symbol of beauty alongside past participants such as Tyra Banks, Gisele Bündchen and Heidi Klum shows things are changing, Bloom told Variety.

“I think it’s just a powerful time right now,” Bloom told Variety. “I’m so happy Sports Illustrated wanted to have the nerve to really say, ‘We got to have this moment, and if you don’t like it, you can go somewhere else.’ ”

Sports Illustrated’s swimsuit issue — once described in a 1998 Washington Post article as “mainstream, middlebrow … middle American” and little more than “a volume of cheesecake portraiture” — has tried in recent years to stay abreast of an ever-changing social landscape.

In 2018, the issue’s creators reacted to the #MeToo era with a photo shoot in which women crafted their own messages with carefully chosen words written on their naked bodies or clothing. In 2019, the issue for the first time featured a model wearing a hijab and burkini. Last year, a 56-year-old woman graced the pages.

“That’s the great thing about Sports Illustrated is they just keep reinventing themselves and they keep reinventing what is your view of beauty,” Kathy Jacobs, the 56-year-old woman, told the AP. “And they keep showing people that there’s more than one kind of beauty out there.”

Bloom, a transgender woman who’s Black and Filipina, is now part of that representation.

In March, a New York Times reporter asked Bloom if being in the swimsuit issue was the best way for people to learn that you can be respected, appreciated and loved no matter your body shape, sexuality or skin color.

“It’s one way,” she responded. “This is a way of reaching the top of the food chain. Let’s at least have this moment and say that we had it, and then we can go on to dismantle it.”

But, Bloom added, beauty standards that aren’t easy to shatter can be made more inclusive. “Up to now, it was strictly, ‘Oh, you’re trans so you cannot be a princess.’ But when we’re seen in these spaces — the runways, the magazines — trans children can look up and say, ‘This is what a princess looks like to me.’ ”

Bloom said she thinks of herself as “a third sex” and that as she’s gotten older, she’s become more in tune with both her masculine and feminine energies. That wasn’t easy, she told The Times. She said she was raped as a child and fetishized as an adult, so the life of a princess didn’t always seem attainable.

“I have dreamt a million beautiful dreams, but for girls like me, most dreams are just fanciful hopes in a world that often erases and omits our history and even existence,” Bloom said Monday on Instagram.

Click here to read the full article on The Washington Post.

Courteney Cox finally gets her Emmy revenge with ‘Friends’ nomination
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Courteney Cox was the only "Friends" cast member who was never nominated for an Emmy -- up until now.

By Juliet Norman, New York Post

Courteney Cox can breathe a sigh of relief. The actress, 57, known for playing Monica Geller on “Friends,” has finally gotten an Emmy nomination for the series — 17 years after its finale. Until now, every other “Friends” cast member had received at least one nomination from the Television Academy for achievements in acting. The NBC series received 62 Primetime Emmy nominations during its 10-year-long run.

This year, the HBO Max “Friends: The Reunion” special is up for four golden statuettes, including Best Special, Pre-Recorded. Because Cox served as a producer on the special, alongside the rest of her former castmates and the show’s creators, Marta Kauffman and David Crane, Cox is technically nominated in that category.

Cox celebrated the win by sharing the announcement on Instagram and crediting her castmates.

“The one where we are incredibly grateful to the Academy for this honor and especially thankful for @mrbenwinston and his entire team for their outstanding achievement,” she wrote on Tuesday.

Cox’s female co-stars on “Friends,” Lisa Kudrow, 57, and Jennifer Aniston, 52, have both gotten multiple nominations for the sitcom and each won, Kudrow for Best Supporting Actress in a Comedy Series and Aniston for Best Actress in a Comedy Series. All three of her male co-stars received at least one nomination for the comedy series.

Cox said on “The Howard Stern Show” last month that watching all of her castmates receive nominations “definitely hurt my feelings.” “I was happy for everybody, and then when it was finally like, ‘Oh, I’m the only one,’ it hurt,” she said.

Despite the award show not recognizing Cox’s talent, the actress was nominated for a Golden Globe in 2010 as well as several other awards for her leading role in ABC’s “Cougar Town” as Jules Cobb, a divorced suburban wine-mom. Cox said being nominated helped soften the blow.

“The only thing that made me feel good — because they’ve all won and they’ve gotten so many accolades — I got nominated for ‘Cougar Town’ the first year — a Golden Globe,” she told Howard Stern. “And I want to say, ‘Oh, who cares?’ [But] it meant everything to me.”

Click here to read the full article on New York Post.

Jennifer Lopez set to produce and star in Broadway production for TV
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Jennifer Lopez cover story

By Ian Mohr, New York Post

Jennifer Lopez is going Broadway.

JLo has reportedly partnered with Oracle scion and Hollywood producer David Ellison’s production outfit, Skydance, to develop musical projects for TV and film.

The musicals will be based on the Concord Theatricals library, which includes the Rodgers & Hammerstein catalog. Rodgers & Hammerstein’s famed musicals include “Carousel,” “South Pacific,” “The King & I,” “The Sound of Music,” “Cinderella” and “Oklahoma!” among others.

Lopez’s Nuyorican Productions will develop the projects with Skydance, and Lopez will star in at least one of the projects, Variety reported.

Lopez, 51, said in a statement: “Musicals were a part of the tapestry of my childhood. We’re so excited to begin our association with Skydance and Concord in reinterpreting some of the most classic musicals and bringing them to life in new ways for a new generation.”

Skydance already had a deal in place with Concord and has been developing a TV series version of “Oklahoma!” — from “The Blind Side” director John Lee Hancock and “This Is Us” writer Bekah Brunstetter — that would be set in modern times.

Lopez’s producing partners Elaine Goldsmith-Thomas and Benny Medina will executive-produce the musical projects. Ellison is the producer behind Tom Cruise’s upcoming “Top Gun: Maverick” and “Mission: Impossible 8” movies, as well as “Terminator: Dark Fate.”

Meanwhile, Page Six recently reported that Lopez and Ben Affleck, 48, were spending time together in the Hamptons over July Fourth weekend. The couple have not publicly commented on the relationship — but Lopez said during a recent interview, “I’ve never been better.” She also recently “liked” a Bennifer fan account’s photo of Affleck on the set of his 2010 heist film “The Town.”

Click here to read the full article on the New York Post.

Behind Her Empire: Luminary CEO Cate Luzio On Steering a Startup Through the Pandemic
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The daughter of two civil servants, Luzio said she picked up on the values that her father championed. She shared how her father encouraged her to pick herself up when she was down, and to remember she was ok. To start her business

By Yasmin Nouri, dot. LA

The daughter of two civil servants, Luzio said she picked up on the values that her father championed. She shared how her father encouraged her to pick herself up when she was down, and to remember she was ok.

“You have got to make your mark and, you know what, you are going to get pushed down a million times in your life,” Luzio said. “The defining part is can you get back up and just keep going.”

Luzio never saw herself going into banking, much less founding a company. At the start of her career, she worked for a small tech startup, where she had the opportunity to work on joint ventures in China. Shortly after, she decided to go back to school to get her masters, and then was recruited by a bank. “I remember thinking, ‘why are they even talking to me? I know nothing about this,’ she said. “All I know is what I’ve been doing. And I love international and I now have a master’s degree.”

Luzio loved corporate work, especially the stability. As she began to form the idea of Luminary, she said she returned to her corporate experience to make a business plan for herself, tracking the path she wanted to take.

“Just like I said no one would ever think I was a banker, I would have said, ‘I can’t run it. I don’t know how to run a company. I don’t have ideas.’ And then I did.”

Now, she makes a point to work with corporate members at Luminary as part of her ongoing networking efforts. Networking, she said, has been a cornerstone to her career, both as a banker and as an entrepreneur.

On the rest of this episode, Luzio talks about her goals for Luminary, about supporting and being supported by other female founders, and the confidence she finds knowing she can return to corporate work if she ever is inclined. She also discussed at length the measures she took to make it through the pandemic at such an early-stage with her company.

Cate Luzio is the founder and CEO of Luminary, a resource and physical space for female founders to connect and support one another.

Click here to read the full article on dot. LA.

Lavender Brown actress Jessie Cave said she was ‘treated like a different species’ on ‘Harry Potter’ after gaining weight
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Jessie Cave played Lavender Brown in the "Harry Potter" film series. Warner Bros. Pictures/David M. Benett/Dave Benett/WireImage

By Insider

Jessie Cave has opened up about her struggles with body image pressure while playing Lavender Brown in the “Harry Potter” movies. Cave, who won the role of Lavender after over 7,000 people auditioned, told The Independent that she gained weight in between finishing “The Half-Blood Prince” and shooting “Deathly Hallows” parts 1 and 2.

“I gained a lot of weight after doing Harry Potter, just because I wasn’t starving myself. And I was growing up and that’s just what happens,” Cave said. Her return to the set having gained weight, however, was not a pleasant one. “I was treated like a different species. It was horrible. It was probably more me and my insecurity, knowing that I wasn’t fitting into the same size jeans, but it wasn’t a time where actresses were any bigger than a size eight,” Cave said.

“And in the previous film I had been, and now I was a size 12. So that was horrible. It was a really uncomfortable experience.” Insider has reached out to Warner Bros. for comment.

Cave featured most prominently as Lavender in “The Half-Blood Prince,” where her character becomes infatuated with Rupert Grint’s Ron Weasley and engages in a very pubic, PDA-filled relationship. Lavender’s heart is broken when Ron unwittingly reveals he pines for Hermione. Cave returned as Lavender in the final two “Potter” instalments in much smaller roles.

The role of Lavender was originally played by a different actress, Jennifer Smith, in “The Prisoner of Azkaban” before being recast later in the franchise.

Click here to read the full article on Insider.

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  1. Women in Federal Law Enforcement (WIFLE)
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  2. WIFLE Annual Leadership Training
    August 16, 2021 - August 19, 2021
  3. WiCyS 2021 Conference
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