Pose star Sandra Bernhard: ‘I never tried to be revolutionary. That’s just who I was’
LinkedIn
‘I’ve been fighting about the same things since I was a teenager’ ... Sandra Bernhard. Photograph: Brian Ziegler

By The Guardian

During nearly five decades in showbiz, Sandra Bernhard has racked up title after title – comedian, actor, singer, author, radio host – and a reputation for controversy. She has worked with a long list of superstars, from Richard Pryor and Robin Williams to Robert De Niro and Cyndi Lauper. But she has never been overshadowed; her force of personality has guaranteed that. Even 30 years ago, the Los Angeles Times was paying homage to her “acid-tongued, antagonistic persona”.

But there are no cutting remarks today. On this sunny morning in LA, she appears relaxed, in a pink-striped shirt and trousers, reminiscent of the early 80s outfits she wore for her many appearances on Late Night With David Letterman.

It is almost a year since she finished filming the final series of Pose, the much-praised TV drama exploring the ball scene in 80s New York and the gay and transgender artists who built it. Bernhard plays Judy Kubrak, a nurse caring for people dying with Aids. Judy has an activist streak, bringing other characters into the fight against neglectful politicians and cruel pharmaceutical companies.

It feels like the perfect role for Bernhard, who has always laced her shows with political commentary, has been open about her own bisexuality and was embedded in New York’s cultural underground during the ball era. She remembers that time fondly: “There were events and art openings, fashion shows and parties. For sure, there was a gay scene, but everything sort of melded together.”

It was there she met her longtime musical director, Mitch Kaplan, and the conceptual artist John Boskovich. Together, they developed her breakthrough one-woman show, Without You I’m Nothing, With You, I’m Not Much Better, which she performed off-Broadway in 1988. “Almost every night, we went out afterwards, dancing, or hung out on Second Avenue. There were a lot more people on the street. It was just a more accessible, affordable situation back then.”

Yet the era was tinged with tragedy as Aids took hold. “I lost many, many good friends. We were all terrified and sad,” Bernhard says. It was particularly tough for trans people. “Back then, if you were trans, chances are you lived on the street, you hustled and you probably contracted Aids,” she says. “Nobody took trans people seriously. The underlying theme of Pose was to really honour that community’s work and artistry.

“When I got the role on Pose, it was kind of full circle. I had been part of it, seen my friends in hospital and known what people went through: the degradation, loneliness and alienation. There was a lot to inform my performance.”

One relationship from this time still trails Bernhard from interview to interview: her friendship with Madonna. “We’d met many times, but she didn’t seem that interested in being friends until she came to see my show in New York,” she says. “We kind of clicked then.”

The pair began hanging out, going to parties and plays. In July 1988, Bernhard was on Letterman again and brought a surprise: Madonna. The pair, dressed in matching denim shorts, white T-shirts and ankle socks, wrested control from the helpless host.

Rumours of an affair followed them. “Two women hanging out? Of course it’s going to be sexual,” Bernhard says with perfect sarcasm. “I mean, we kind of flirted with that purposefully. We left it ambiguous and crazy; it was almost like an ongoing performance piece.”

Bernhard, 66, has never made a secret of her bisexuality. She has been with her partner, Sara Switzer, formerly an editor at Harper’s Bazaar, for more than two decades. They met in the late 90s, not long after Bernhard gave birth to her daughter Cicely, whom they raised in New York. She has never named Cicely’s father.

Click here to read the full article on the Guardian.

Crisis Text Line to Support Spanish-Speaking Texters Experiencing a Mental Health Crisis
LinkedIn
women hand are using cell phone to text

Crisis Text Line, the not-for-profit providing free crisis counseling via text message, will begin offering its service in Spanish on October 15, 2021. The organization is actively recruiting and training volunteers who are bilingual in English and Spanish to help support the underserved population of LatinX experiencing crisis.

The need for this service is high. Suicide among young Latinas is a major public health concern as they attempt suicide more often than any other group of female teenagers nationwide, according to the CDC.

The fact that LatinX people across the U.S. have a hard time finding mental health care services in their native language fuels this inequity. According to the recent data released by the American Psychological Association, only 5.5% of U.S. psychologists say they’re able to administer mental health care services in Spanish. Research indicates that language is a primary barrier preventing Spanish speakers in the U.S. from accessing mental health services.

“Our goal has always been to support people in crisis with the technology that is comfortable to them. Thanks to the hard work of our team and bilingual volunteer Crisis Counselors, we can also serve texters who feel most comfortable getting mental health support in Spanish,” said Dena Trujillo, Crisis Text Line Interim CEO.

Crisis Text Line is a free service powered by a community of volunteer Crisis Counselors who help individuals in distress, bringing them from a moment of crisis to a cool calm moment through de-escalation, problem-solving, and active listening skills. The organization is actively recruiting and training volunteers who are bilingual in English and Spanish. To apply to become a volunteer, visit https://www.crisistextline.org/palabras.

LatinX texters already make up 17% of Crisis Text Line’s texters, based on voluntary demographic data. English-speaking LatinX texters tend to be younger (56% were 17 or younger) and more likely to be female (79%) than all texters combined.

During the Spanish service pilot, Crisis Text Line had more than 1,000 conversations with texters in Spanish and observed that Spanish-speaking texters were more likely to discuss depression, anxiety, and relationship issues than the Crisis Text Line average during the same time. The majority of texters who used the Spanish service were from Texas, California and Florida.

“I’m incredibly proud of the culturally competent, first of its kind, service we built to help the Spanish-speaking community in the way they deserve,” said Natalia Dayan, Crisis Text Line Localization Director.

Crisis Text Line is known for its innovative use of technology and data, leveraging machine learning to stack-rank incoming messages in order to serve the highest risk texters first. To increase access to the service for Spanish speaking texters, Crisis Text Line also launched a new modality: WhatsApp. Now, anyone in crisis can also reach a volunteer Crisis Counselor on WhatsApp, an app with over 32 million Hispanic and LatinX users.

About Crisis Text Line
Crisis Text Line has been providing free, 24/7, confidential support for people in crisis via text since 2013. Volunteer Crisis Counselors complete a 30-hour training and have 24/7 supervision by full-time Crisis Text Line mental health professionals. Text HOLA to 741741 or text to 442-AYUDAME in WhatsApp to be connected to a trained Crisis Counselor in Spanish. Text CRISIS to 741741 for English. Crisis Text Line currently offers its service in theUSA, UK, Canada, and Ireland.

Learn more at www.crisistextline.org.

An Afghan refugee girl grew up to be a prize-winning doc — with a little help from dad
LinkedIn
Dr. Saleema Rehman stands outside Holy Family Hospital in Rawalpindi, Pakistan. The Afghan refugee of Turkmen origin has won UNHCR's Nansen Award for her work helping refugee moms and babies in Pakistan.

By Ruchi Kumar, NPR

When Saleema Rehman was a kid growing up in refugee camps in Pakistan, her nickname was “Doctor Saleema.”

Her mom faced severe complications while delivering her – and Rehman’s dad, Abdul, promised that if the baby lived, he would make sure the child became a doctor.

Today, Rehman, 29, is a gynecologist serving displaced Afghan women in the city of Attock, Pakistan. According to the U.N., she is the first female refugee doctor from Afghanistan’s Turkmen ethnic group. And last week, she won UNHCR’s regional Nansen Refugee Award, an annual prize given to individuals doing outstanding work for displaced people.

“She’s a trailblazer. She’s beaten the odds by becoming the first female doctor in her community. By achieving her dream of offering health care to the most vulnerable – refugees and Pakistanis alike – Saleema is a living testament to how women can contribute to the socioeconomic development of their communities,” said Noriko Yoshida, UNHCR’s representative in Pakistan, in a statement.

Rehman says her mom’s harrowing birth story had a profound impact on her work. “My mother needed an urgent surgery to deliver me, but there were no facilities or resources to go to,” she says. “The traditional midwife didn’t know if I would survive.”

While her mother pulled through the traumatic ordeal, it prompted her father to pledge his support to educate his daughter – and encourage her to become a doctor.

Despite that he was a daily wage laborer, Rehman says her dad had an ambitious vision for her future. “He believed in the importance of education and supported me despite criticisms from conservative community members.”

Traditionally, women in Rehman’s community are trained to be carpet weavers at home and married off early. “People would come to him and tell him to not send me to school because it might have a negative influence on the other girls. They were afraid the other girls would also be inspired to study further,” Rehman says.

“But my father listened to no one,” she adds. “He would sell fruits during the day and make carpet designs until late in the night to provide for” the family and pay for her education.

Click here to read the full article on NPR.

Kate Moss’ Daughter Lila Walks Runway With Insulin Pump: ‘You Are an Inspiration’
LinkedIn
Kate Moss' 19 year old daughter Lilly Grace on the runway

By Francesca Gariano, NBC

Kate Moss’ daughter, Lila Grace Moss, made a big statement on the runway to close out Milan Fashion Week.

Moss walked the catwalk at Fendi and Versace’s combined show, appropriately dubbed “Fendace,” on Sunday, Sept. 26. The 19-year-old model, who has type 1 diabetes, donned a cropped jacket and a baroque-pattered bodysuit with her legs on full display, including her insulin pump below her hip on her thigh.

The model shared a snap from the runway on Instagram in a carousel post, adding videos of her walk as well as behind-the-scenes moments from the show.

Though she didn’t call attention to her insulin pump in her caption, fans in the comments lauded Moss for not hiding her insulin pump and giving type 1 diabetes visibility in the fashion industry.

“The whole T1d community salute you 💙,” one commenter wrote.

Another added, “I love showing my 11yr old T1 daughter your pics. 👏❤️.”

“As a fellow T1 diabetic (and ex model), THANK YOU for wearing your device on the freaking runway!” one user wrote. “You are a queen and I want these pics everywhere cos the more we share of T1 diabetes the better 🙌.”

One fan penned a touching note to Moss, calling her decision “groundbreaking,” adding, “You have no idea how inspiring this photo is, not only to type 1 diabetics, but young girls everywhere to show the real you and not let anything hold you back.”

“You are an inspiration to those girls everywhere,” they added. “Your strength and resilience shows. Keep up the great work and thank you for your representation.”

According to the CDC, type 1 diabetes is a disease that occurs when the body’s pancreas stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar levels. An insulin pump is a tubeless pump filled with insulin that is worn directly on the body to deliver doses of the hormone around the clock.

Moss opened up about her diabetes last August in an interview with The Kit. When asked about something that most people wouldn’t know about her, the model revealed her diagnosis publicly in her response.

“I think not many people know that I have diabetes,” she said. “It’s not visible from the outside, so no one would really know just by looking at you. I have type 1.”

Click here to read the full article on NBC.

‘Girls aren’t firefighters’: How women are making firefighting more inclusive
LinkedIn
firefighters women making industry more inclusive

By Haley Talbot, Julie Tsirkin and Alicia Victoria Lozano, NBC News.

Capt. Karen Bureker didn’t know whether she wanted to have children when she first became a firefighter paramedic nearly 20 years ago.

But after getting married, Bureker and her husband decided to start a family. It was during her first pregnancy, after six years on the job, that Bureker realized just how difficult the transition from firefighter to mother would be while rising through the ranks of her male-dominated profession.

“It’s really a great job to be a mom, but it’s a really hard job,” she said. “My kids, as they get older, are starting to understand some of the risks that we take. But they love having their mom be a firefighter.”

Bureker, 44, is part of a rare sorority. Earlier this month, she became the first female fire captain at Tualatin Valley Fire and Rescue near Portland, where she started her career some 19 years ago. Back then, just six women worked as firefighters in the department, she said.

“We were definitely new to the fire scene,” she added. “The world has changed a lot since then, and our jobs have changed a lot. We’ve had a lot of men with a lot of interest in pushes that have helped move us into a more inclusive and diverse fire service.”

Despite the push for more diversity in hiring, less than 5 percent of career firefighters across the country are women, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Like their male counterparts, these women face increasingly dire conditions as drought, climate change and heat waves contribute to longer, hotter and deadlier fire seasons.

These women also face added mental stress from gender discrimination, plus an increased risk of miscarriage and other reproductive problems from repeated exposure to smoke and other toxins.

“When you think of a firefighter, you think of a man,” said Jenna Gray, who recently attended a fire camp for young women interested in learning more about the profession. “I think it’s really important for young girls to see that they, too, can do these jobs that only men over the last who knows how many years have been doing. It just gives you a sense of ‘I can do anything.'”

Yet a new generation of female firefighters is confronted with a system that was never built to include them. Few departments offer uniforms tailored specifically to women, forcing them to wear protective gear that fits incorrectly and exposes them to environmental hazards.

Click here to read the full article on NBC News.

Greta Thunberg roasts world leaders for being ‘blah, blah, blah’ on climate action
LinkedIn
Greta Thunberg standing in front of a crowd protesting climate change

By Angela Dewan, CNN

Swedish activist Greta Thunberg mocked world leaders — including US President Joe Biden and the UK’s Boris Johnson — at a youth climate summit in Milan on Tuesday, saying the last 30 years of climate action had amounted to “blah, blah, blah.”

Thunberg imitated the leaders by repeating their commonly used expressions on the climate crisis, shooting them down as empty words and unfulfilled promises.

“When I say climate change, what do you think of? I think jobs. Green jobs. Green jobs,” she said, referencing Biden’s speeches on the climate crisis.

“We must find a smooth transition towards a low carbon economy. There is no Planet B,” she said, in a reference to a speech given by French President Emmanuel Macron. “There is no Planet Blah. Blah, blah, blah, blah, blah, blah.”

And in her jibe at UK Prime Minister Johnson, Thunberg derided the leader’s rhetoric around his government’s “green recovery” plans.

“This is not about some expensive, politically correct dream at the bunny hugging or blah, blah, blah. Build back better, blah, blah, blah. Green economy, blah, blah, blah,” Thunberg said.

“Net zero, blah, blah, blah. Climate neutral, blah, blah, blah. This is all we hear from our so-called leaders — words, words that sound great but so far, has led to no action or hopes and dreams. Empty words and promises.”

Thunberg was speaking at the Youth4Climate forum, an event held two days before dozens of ministers convene in Milan for a final high-level meeting before the COP26 climate talks in Glasgow in November. COP26 President Alok Sharma was at the youth event and will be chairing the ministers’ meeting.

The youth attendees will come up with a list of recommendations for ministers to consider later this week. Ministers are expected to try and align their positions on issues on the Glasgow agenda, including putting an end date on the use of coal and who should pay what to assist the Global South in its transition to low-carbon economies.

An activist from Uganda, Vanessa Nakate, said that the developing world was still waiting on the rich world to make good on its climate finance promises.

Leaders from developed nations agreed a decade ago to transfer money to developing countries to help them reduce their carbon emissions but also to adapt to the climate crisis. That promise was reaffirmed in 2015 in Paris, where world leaders again agreed to transfer $100 billion a year to the Global South 2020, at least half of which was to go to adaptation. That deadline was missed last year.

“There is far too little evidence of the $100 billion per year that was promised to help climate vulnerable countries to meet this challenge. But those funds were promised to arrive by 2020 and we are still waiting,” Nakate said, pointing out that Africa pollutes very little but is on the front line of the climate crisis.

Click here to read the full article on CNN.

Adrienne Warren, Sheila Atim Join Viola Davis in Historical Drama ‘The Woman King’ (Exclusive)
LinkedIn
The woman king actresses Adrienne Warren Sheila Atim COURTESY OF STEPHANIE DIANI; SONY

BY BORYS KIT, The Hollywood Reporter

Adrienne Warren, the newly minted best actress in a musical at Sunday’s Tony Awards for her work in Tina: The Tina Turner Musical, and Olivier Award-winning actress Sheila Atim, have joined the cast of The Woman King, a historical epic from TriStar.

Viola Davis and Thuso Mbedu are toplining the drama that also counts Lashana Lynch and John Boyega on the roll call.

Gina Prince-Bythewood, who most recently directed Netflix’s sci-fi actioner The Old Guard, is on board to helm the feature that will begin shooting in November in South Africa.

Per the studio, the project is inspired by true events that took place in the Kingdom of Dahomey, one of the most powerful states of Africa in the 18th and 19th centuries. The story follows Nanisca (Davis), general of an all-female military unit, and Nawi (Mbedu), an ambitious recruit, who together fight enemies who violated their honor, enslaved their people and threatened to destroy everything they’ve lived for.

Warren and Atim will play warriors in Nanisca’s elite unit.

Dana Stevens wrote the original screenplay, with the current draft from Stevens and Prince-Bythewood.

Producing are Cathy Schulman via her Welle Entertainment, Davis and Julius Tennon via JuVee Productions and Maria Bello via her banner, Jack Blue.

Warren starred as iconic singer Turner in Tina, which, on top of Sunday’s Tony, has earned her Drama Desk, Outer Critics Circle and Antonyo awards. Warren also received a special Tony Award this year for her work as co-founder of the Broadway Advocacy Coalition, which was founded by members of the Broadway Community as a direct response to racism and police brutality in the U.S. The actress will return to her acclaimed starring role for a limited engagement when Tina reopens at The Lunt-Fontanne Theatre on Oct. 8.

Atim appeared with Mbedu in Barry Jenkins’ acclaimed limited series, The Underground Railroad. She will be seen in Bruised, the directorial debut of actress Halle Berry, as well as the live-action retelling of Disney’s Pinocchio from Robert Zemeckis.

Click here to read the full article on the Hollywood Reporter.

Amy Schumer Reveals Tumor Was Found During Uterus Removal Surgery, Says ‘Lifelong Pain’ Has Healed
LinkedIn
Amy Schumer wearing a black top while smiling at the camera

By , US Weekly

She’s a survivor. Amy Schumer shared an update a week after her uterus was surgically removed. “I’m feeling stronger and thrilled about life,” the comedian, 40, shared via Instagram on Sunday, September 26.

Her doctor walked her through everything they found in surgery. Of the 30 specimens that were taken to the lab, 26 tested positive for endometriosis. Her appendix was removed during the hysterectomy because the endometriosis had attacked it, but pathology revealed that there was actually a tumor there. Many “chocolate cysts” — noncancerous, fluid-filled cysts — were also found.

Schumer is over the moon that the surgery removed so much. Not only has the pain stopped, but the surgery confirmed that there were very serious medical factors causing her body to suffer.

“All my lifelong pain explained and lifted out of my body. I am already a changed person,” the Trainwreck star added. “I am busting with joy for the new energy I have to be with my son.”

Many women suffer from endometriosis without diagnosis for years, with the 2016 documentary Endo What? reporting that the average time for a diagnosis after the onset of symptoms is about 8 to 10 years.

The leading lady, who also suffers from Lyme disease, opened up about her surgery on September 18 when she shared photos and videos from the hospital. She said she was already feeling her energy return hours after surgery.

Schumer, who married chef Chris Fischer in February 2018, has been open in recent years about her health struggles. She had a difficult pregnancy with her son, Gene, now 2, and a year before having her uterus removed, she said her body can’t handle being pregnant again.

“We did IVF and IVF was really tough on me. I don’t think I could ever do IVF again,” she said during an appearance on Sunday Today With Willie Geist in August 2020.

Click here to read the full article on US Weekly.

Exclusive: ESPN to debut its first all-women baseball broadcast
LinkedIn
The two sports announcers will be ESPN's first all-woman broadcast team for a nationally televised Major League Baseball game on September 29.

By Frank Pallotta, Eirie News Today

Melanie Newman and Jessica Mendoza aren’t done making history.

The two sports announcers will be ESPN’s first all-woman broadcast team for a nationally televised Major League Baseball game on September 29. The game will mark the first time ESPN has had an all-woman broadcast team for a MLB, NBA, NFL regular season or playoff game. The teams that will be playing are not yet determined.

Newman and Mendoza have put their names in the history books before. Newman was a part of MLB’s first-ever all-female broadcast in July while Mendoza became the first female analyst to call a nationally televised MLB playoff game in 2015. Mendoza, ESPN’s first regular female MLB analyst, has been with the network since 2007.

Mendoza is a two-time Olympic medal winner and was a four-time All-American on Stanford University’s softball team.

“Honestly, each earmark is just another page,” Newman told CNN Business. “I feel fortunate to be the one handed this chance, it’s our responsibility until there are no more firsts and its just an even playing field of all-qualified professionals who happen to look different.”

Mendoza echoed Newman’s sentiments, saying “it is important to have more people represent the game of baseball.”

“For young girls, women and Latinas, to hear a voice that represents them is so impactful for not only the sport to grow its audience, but to continue to broaden the opportunities for more young girls, women and Latinas to do the same,” she told CNN Business.

Newman, who also made history as the first woman in Orioles history to call a regular-season game in 2020, will provide play-by-play commentary for two ESPN baseball telecasts as the network puts together its “pennant race” stretch of 11 games in 11 days. Her first will be Wednesday, when the San Francisco Giants take on the San Diego Padres.

She also believes that representation is important in growing America’s first professional sport.

“Representation absolutely matters,” Newman said. “The number of younger girls who have felt they couldn’t be a fan of sports in general solely out of not seeing women in front still amazes me.”

Click here to read the full article on Eirie News Today.

‘Dancing with the Stars’ recap: JoJo Siwa, pro-partner Jenna Johnson make history, lead the pack
LinkedIn
Pop star JoJo Siwa and pro dancer Jenna Johnson were last to dance Monday night and first on the judges' leaderboard with 29 out of 40 points.

By George Pennacchio

“Dancing with the Stars” waltzed back into primetime for its 30th season. And after just one dance apiece, the stars and their professional partners know this season is going to be a very competitive one.

Pop star JoJo Siwa and pro dancer Jenna Johnson were last to dance Monday night and first on the judges’ leaderboard with 29 out of 40 points. As the show’s first same-sex dance couple, JoJo says the night couldn’t have gone any better.

“I actually didn’t want the audience to say anything. I wanted the audience to smile,” said Siwa. “And I wanted the audience to just be like, ‘Huh, wow, two girls dancing together, that’s cool.'”

One point behind them: a tie between Olympian Suni Lee and Sasha Farber and talk show host Amanda Kloots and Alan Bersten. Actor Martin Kove and Britt Stewart landed at the bottom of the leaderboard with only 13 points for their paso doble.

“Dancing with the Stars” is always a challenge and when you want to win, you can be driven.

“I don’t have time for fear. You have one opportunity. Here we are. We’re live. You have to make it happen,” said Kenya Moore.

“Right after our dance, I sat down next to her and I cried a little bit,” said Cody Rigsby. “This is so much hard work, and it’s an emotional release. I’m happy. I’m getting emotional about it right now.”

And week one is done for real-life couple Brian Austin Green and Sharna Burgess.

“It’s the unknown, and now I feel like ‘This wasn’t as difficult or scary as I thought it was going to be. Let’s get in and work on next week’s performance,'” said Brian Austin Green.

All 15 couples return to dance again next week but by the end of the evening, the first couple of the season will go home.

Click here to read the full article on ABC 7.

Mary-Kate & Ashley Designed Elizabeth Olsen’s Emmys Dress
LinkedIn
Mary-Kate & Ashley Olsen Designed Elizabeth Olsen’s Emmys Dress

By Bella Gerard, Yahoo! Life

When your two older sisters are some of the most famous fashionistas in the world, shining your own sartorial light can be difficult. But not for Elizabeth Olsen! Since rising to her own separate stardom, Olsen has proved her own personal style is worthy of just as much praise. Like, I’d kill for an Elizabeth Olsen x The Row collection! Until then, though, I’m always happy to wax poetic on Elizabeth Olsen’s style and her best fashion moments in general.

Of course, I need to start with her 2021 Emmys look, hot off the red carpet. At last year’s Emmys, nominees were mailed video kits to livestream from their homes, so it went without saying that the virtual red carpet just wasn’t as special as it would’ve been in person. This year, though, stars came to slay at the L.A. Live entertainment complex—and of course, Olsen was no exception.

Stealing the show from the moment she showed up, Olsen wore an absolutely breathtaking flowing white gown by The Row. Yep, her sisters Mary-Kate and Ashley designed it for her. Y’all, I’m tearing up! Looks like we’re one step closer to that Elizabeth Olsen x The Row collection I was wishing for earlier.

Olsen was nominated for Outstanding Lead Actress In A Limited Or Anthology Series or Movie for her role as Wanda Maximoff from WandaVision, so of course she had to look the part of a lovely leading lady. While many nominees go for form-fitting gowns on the carpet, I’m loving this more relaxed silhouette for an elegant, ethereal twist.

To complement the dress, Olsen wore her short hair in soft, Old Hollywood-inspired waves with a deep side part to show off some massive dangling earrings by Chopard, which boasted 68.77 carats of diamonds set in titanium. As for glam, she kept with those classic vibes going with a super smokey eye and neutral but defined lip.

Click here to read the full article on Yahoo! Life.

Air Force Civilian Service

Air Force Civilian Service

Lumen

Lumen

Verizon AD

Verizon

Breast Cancer

pink ribbon on a pink background with the text October is Breast cancer Awareness Month

American Family Insurance

American Family Insurance

Statement

#Stopthehate

Upcoming Events

  1. LULAC 2021 National Women’s Conference
    November 12, 2021 - November 13, 2021
  2. CSUN Center on Disabilities 2022 Conference
    March 13, 2022 - March 18, 2022
  3. WiCyS 2022 Conference
    March 17, 2022 - March 19, 2022

Upcoming Events

  1. LULAC 2021 National Women’s Conference
    November 12, 2021 - November 13, 2021
  2. CSUN Center on Disabilities 2022 Conference
    March 13, 2022 - March 18, 2022
  3. WiCyS 2022 Conference
    March 17, 2022 - March 19, 2022